Sweet Carolina waters: too sweet from Splenda?

Sucralose, more commonly known as Splenda, is sweetening the coastal waterways in North Carolina.

The chemical makeup of a sucralose atom.

The chemical makeup of a sucralose atom.

The University of North Carolina in Wilmington did a study on the waters and discovered all of their samples had a pollutant in it. According to NaturalNews.com, that pollutant was later confirmed as sucralose, an ingredient used in many sweeteners.

Sucralose has been considered calorie-free – something many Americans are interested in. The only reason it is considered to not have any calories is because it  goes straight through the body. Only 10 percent is actually metabolized.

For more than 20 years, sucralose has been mixed in American foods and drinks. But many people do not know all of the risks that they could face by consuming it:

  • Diarrhea
  • Bloating
  • Nausea
  • Runny nose
  • Coughing
  • Skin irritation
  • Itchy eye
  • Hives
  • Mood swings
  • Depression
  • Vision changes
  • Migraines

The researchers quickly confirmed that no wildlife had been harmed on the coast and that it didn’t look like this would be a problem.

A study on the North Carolina coast has detected levels of sucralose in all of the samples. Photo from Fodors.com

A study on the North Carolina coast has detected levels of sucralose in all of the samples. Photo from Fodors.com

But based off what sucralose can do to a human, there may be side affects that were not detected, since this news only broke this morning.

In studies, rats that were given sucralose became much more obese. Their body also killed off good intestinal bacteria. There has not been enough time to determine these side effects aren’t happening in the coastal waters.

It is unknown where the sucralose is coming from.

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